What Are Domain Names and How Do They Work

This tutorial will look at what the concept of Domain Names, and how they work. Every website on the Internet can be located by its IP address. The IP address is a unique set of numbers, assigned to every computer that has access to the Internet. Our hosting servers all have IP addresses, which you will be included in your welcome email. Anyone looking for your website can enter those numbers in the address bar of their browser, and they will find your website. So, are you going to tell people to look for you on the Internet by just entering 182.96.47.12? (Just an example.) Will anyone remember that?

This is where the idea of Domain Names came about. Instead of having to enter a bunch of numbers, we can now assign a name to those numbers. Domain names can contain letters, numbers and hyphens. They can be hundreds of characters in length, but the shorter the domain name, the better. You can also have more than one domain name pointing at the same website.

A domain name is an easy to remember address that can be translated by domain name servers into server IP addresses. In order for your computer to figure out what IP address to use for a domain name, it has to connect with a name server, which is also called a DNS server. That server connects with another, which connects with another, and so on, until a server is found that knows the correct IP address for the domain name. When you purchase a domain name, you make sure the settings show that all requests for an IP address for that domain name are directed to our hosting name servers. The settings will be in the welcome email you receive when you purchase a hosting account with us.

This concludes the tutorial on domain names, and how they work.

 

How To Set Up A Cron Job

This tutorial is going to show you how to setup a cron job in cPanel the easy way. You can set a command or script to run at a specific time every day, week, etc. This tutorial will assume that you are logged into your cPanel. If you are having trouble doing that, please see the tutorial named “How to Login to cPanel”.

Scroll down to the Advanced Section on the main page of your cPanel, and click on the icon named Cron Jobs. This will take you to the main Cron Job page, where it lists two different experience levels to choose from: Standard and Advanced (Unix Style). This tutorial is going to teach the Standard approach.

Click on the Standard Button. This will take you to a screen showing a Standard Cron Manager. Every time a cron job runs, the results are sent to an email address. The top line asks for the email address where you would like the cron job results sent. Enter that address into the box. Below is a box marked Entry 1. The first line is Command to Run: with a box after. In the box you need to enter the command of the script you want to run, including the path (all the way from root) For example, a command might look like this: “home/abc123/public_html/cgi-bin/clients.cgi” This command includes the entire path, all the way from the root directory.

Next, we need to specify the timing of the cron. We need to determine when and how often we want the script to run. There are boxes with different listings above them – Minute(s), Hour(s), Day(s), Month(s), Weekday(s). Using the information within each box, set the time, day, month, and day of the week you want your cron to run. When it is all set click the Save Crontab button. This will take you to a confirmation screen that will verify that your cron job has been set. Click on the Go Back link.

To return to the Standard Cron Manager at any time, click on the Standard button on the main Cron Job page. You can edit your cron, or delete it entirely by simply clicking on the delete button in the Entry box. You can also set up additional cron jobs. Return to your main cPanel page by clicking the HOME link in the upper left corner.

This is the end of the tutorial. You now know how to setup Cron Jobs the easy way, and then edit them, delete them, or add additional ones. You can add as many as you wish, but REMEMBER, Cron Jobs have the potential to take up a lot of server resources.

You can now exit cPanel by closing your browser, or by using the Logout button in the upper right corner. Remember, if you are using a public computer, ALWAYS Logout of cPanel before closing due to security reasons.

 

How to Create Custom Error Pages

This tutorial will teach how to create custom Error Pages. Create error pages for 404 Not Found errors and 500 Internal Server Errors, along with 28 other errors. This tutorial will assume that you are logged into your cPanel. If you are having trouble doing that, please see the tutorial named “How to Login to cPanel”.

On your main cPanel page, scroll down to the Advanced section, and Click on the Error Pages link. This will take you to the main error pages page. This page lists many kinds of error pages that you can customize.

Let’s select one, and click on the link. This will take you to an editing page. This is where you create your custom error page. You can include one or more of the listed tags to further customize the page. You can also use HTML tags in your page, making it easy to match the look of your error page to the rest of your web site.

Create your page by entering your text into the big block. For example: The page (then click on the “Requested URL” button) is unavailable. Scroll down and click the Save button. You are now taken to a verification page, showing that your error page is created. Click on the Go Back button.

You can customize any of the listed error pages, but you do not have to if you do not want to. All accounts come with preset standard error pages. Click the HOME button in the upper left corner to return to the main cPanel page.

You can now exit cPanel by closing your browser, or by using the Logout button in the upper right corner. Remember, if you are using a public computer, ALWAYS Logout of cPanel before closing due to security reasons.

 

Shared web hosting service

shared web hosting service or virtual hosting service or derive host refers to a web hosting service where many websites reside on one web server connected to the Internet. Each site “sits” on its own partition, or section/place on the server, to keep it separate from other sites. This is generally the most economical option for hosting, as many people share the overall cost of server maintenance.

The hosting service must include system administration since it is shared by many users; this is a benefit for users who do not want to deal with it, but a hindrance to power users who want more control. In general shared hosting will be inappropriate for users who require extensive software development outside what the hosting provider supports. Almost all applications intended to be on a standard web server work fine with a shared web hosting service. But on the other hand, shared hosting is cheaper than other types of hosting such as dedicated server hosting. Shared hosting usually has usage limits and hosting providers should have extensive reliability features in place.[1]

Shared hosting typically uses a web-based control panel system, such as cPanel, DirectAdmin, Plesk, InterWorx, H-Sphere or one of many other control panel products. Most of the large hosting companies use their own custom developed control panel.[2] Control panels and web interfaces can cause controversy however, since web hosting companies sometimes sell the right to use their control panel system to others. Attempting to recreate the functionality of a specific control panel is common, which leads to many lawsuits over patent infringement.[3]

In shared hosting, the provider is generally responsible for managing servers, installing server software, security updates, technical support, and other aspects of the service. Most servers are based on the Linux operating system and LAMP (software bundle), which is driven by the reliability and security of open source software such as Linux and Apache (the ‘L’ and ‘A’ of LAMP). Some providers offer Microsoft Windows-based or FreeBSD-based solutions. For example, the Plesk control panel is available for two operating systems, Linux and Windows. Server-side facilities for either OS have similar functionality (for example: MySQL (database) and many server-side programming languages (such as the widely used PHP web programming language) under Linux, or the proprietary SQL Server (database) and ASP.NET programming language under Windows).

There are thousands of shared hosting providers in the United States alone. They range from mom-and-pop shops and small design firms to multi-million-dollar providers with hundreds of thousands of customers. A large portion of the shared web hosting market is driven through pay per click (PPC) advertising or Affiliate programs while some are purely non-profit.[4]

Shared web hosting can also be done privately by sharing the cost of running a server in a colocation centre; this is called cooperative hosting.