Optimize Website (gzip compression)

 

We have added an option to our cPanel designed to help you Optimize Website.

To optimize your website login into your cPanel account then Software/Services > Optimize Website
 
Optimize Website
Once you have clicked on Optimize Website you will go to the next step and you will notice that the option is disabled
 
Optimize Website
Here you have 2 options Compress al content and Compress the specified MIME types.
Select the option you desire.
Optimize Website
Once you have selected the option of compression click Update Settings
 
Optimize Website
All done, now you can enjoy the optimization and increased speed in your site.

Cache static content

 

On some statistics sites you will receive messages that you need to Cache Static Content.

The easiest way is to do it by .htaccess
 
Just add the following lines in your .htaccess root file:
FileETag MTime Size
<IfModule mod_expires.c>
  # Enable expirations.
  ExpiresActive On
  # Cache all files for 2 weeks after access (A).
  ExpiresDefault A1209600
  <FilesMatch \.php$>
    # Do not allow PHP scripts to be cached unless they explicitly send cache
    # headers themselves. Otherwise all scripts would have to overwrite the
    # headers set by mod_expires if they want another caching behavior.
    ExpiresActive Off
  </FilesMatch>
</IfModule>

What is an IP Address…Do I need a Dedicated IP

 

This tutorial will look at the definition of IP addresses and help you decide if you need a Dedicated IP. An IP Address is an Internet Protocol Address. It is a unique number address that every server that has access to the Internet is required to have in order for other computers on the WWW to identify the server. To a computer, it is like a phone number.

When you signed up for services from our hosting company, you were given an IP address to use until your domain name propagated. That IP address is how computers from all around the world will find your website, identifying it by the numbers. Every server is running a domain name server (DNS) at all times, which works like a switchboard for all the incoming requests for websites. The server can identify your site based on the IP numbers, and will then fetch it for the browser requesting it. The DNS server is responsible for informing all the other computers on the Internet about your website address and domain name. It keeps track of which domain names correspond to which IP addresses.

The IP address you were given is probably a shared one. You will usually share one with many other domain names. The important thing is that you have an IP address assigned to your domain, and that all the right nameservers know what it is. You can also purchase a dedicated IP Address from us, and that will be your address alone. But do you need a dedicated IP? Most websites don’t. The most common reason that a website would need a dedicated IP is if it requires an SSL certificate for operating secure connections. Usually these are necessary if you are operating a business that processes transactions over the Internet. Any eCommerce site should have an SSL Certificate, and therefore would require a dedicated IP.

This concludes the tutorial about IP’s. You now know a little more about IP’s and dedicated IP’s and who should have one….

What is a Control Panel (cPanel)

 

What is the control panel? The control panel is a vital part of any web hosting account. Without some sort of control panel, you would not be able to do very much. The control panel is where you perform actions on your website, such as creating email accounts, creating databases, setting up security, and many other things. You need some sort of panel, even a basic one. Among the most widely used web hosting panels are cPanel, Plesk, and DirectAdmin. Some control panels only run on Linux, some are meant for Windows, and some will work with both types of operating systems.

One Important Note: Just because your computer at home is running Windows, it doesn’t mean that you need to find a Windows hosting account. You only need a Windows account if your website requires features that only work on Windows. Otherwise, a Linux account will work just as will, and with very few differences. Most Windows accounts cost a little more because of the license costs. This concludes this tutorial.

What do you mean when you say gigabyte, megabyte, or GB and MB

 

This tutorial will explain the different units of measurement that you might find on a computer.

The bit is the smallest unit of measurement on a computer. There is almost always eight bits in one byte. Very often these two terms are confused with each other. To make it even more confusing, the abbreviation for bit is a lowercase b, while byte is abbreviated with an uppercase B.

Most of the time, a kilobyte refers to 1024 bytes. A megabyte is 1024 kilobytes, and a gigabyte is 1024 megabytes. The next level would be terabytes, or 1024 gigabytes, but hard drives really haven’t gotten past that at this point in time.

However, when you are talking about the speed of an internet connection, it is almost always going to be referred to in bits, whether it is kilobits (Kb), megabits (Mb), or gigabits (Gb). So, if the speed of a connection is referred to in megabits, for example, it would be megabits per second, or Mbps. That means a 100 Mbps connection can transfer 100 megabits every second, which equals about 12.5 megabytes per second.

What are Web Servers and are they necessary

 

Web Servers are powerful computers that have extremely large hard drives, or an array of hard drives, that have been set up by a hosting company, usually in a facility called a datacenter. A web server’s only purpose is to store websites until someone wants to visit them, and then to quickly respond to the visitor’s browser with the site’s contents.

A server should be able to respond to at least several dozen requests at a time, if not hundreds. If depends on many factors, including server hardware and how popular the sites are. But even the most expensive server hardware isn’t going to be very useful without the software to actually get things done. The key software programs of a web server are also themselves called servers, or daemons.

Most servers used for web hosting have at least four kinds of software running at all times:

1) An HTTP or web server to provide the websites
2) An FTP server for uploading files
3) An email server or two
4) A database server for storing information essential to the operation of a website)

Why can’t you just run your website from your computer at home? There are several very good reasons why…Most ISP’s specifically disallow people from running any type of web-related server on their networks. Doing so can get your Internet account terminated. Your upload and download speed would be very slow compared to what is offered by hosting companies. Now factor in the cost of electricity and failed parts, and upkeep for running it 24/7, and it is no longer financially good sense. So, now that you have found a great hosting company, stick with us, and we will do the best job for you, at the best cost! This ends this tutorial..

What Are Domain Names and How Do They Work

 

This tutorial will look at what the concept of Domain Names, and how they work. Every website on the Internet can be located by its IP address. The IP address is a unique set of numbers, assigned to every computer that has access to the Internet. Our hosting servers all have IP addresses, which you will be included in your welcome email. Anyone looking for your website can enter those numbers in the address bar of their browser, and they will find your website. So, are you going to tell people to look for you on the Internet by just entering 182.96.47.12? (Just an example.) Will anyone remember that?

This is where the idea of Domain Names came about. Instead of having to enter a bunch of numbers, we can now assign a name to those numbers. Domain names can contain letters, numbers and hyphens. They can be hundreds of characters in length, but the shorter the domain name, the better. You can also have more than one domain name pointing at the same website.

A domain name is an easy to remember address that can be translated by domain name servers into server IP addresses. In order for your computer to figure out what IP address to use for a domain name, it has to connect with a name server, which is also called a DNS server. That server connects with another, which connects with another, and so on, until a server is found that knows the correct IP address for the domain name. When you purchase a domain name, you make sure the settings show that all requests for an IP address for that domain name are directed to our hosting name servers. The settings will be in the welcome email you receive when you purchase a hosting account with us.

This concludes the tutorial on domain names, and how they work.

Introduction to Web Hosting

 

This tutorial will look at some of the things you should look at when you are trying to choose your Domain Name. As you know, a domain name is a quick and easy way for someone to find your website on the Internet. Without a domain name, people would have to remember a series of numbers, or your IP address, and enter that to locate your site.

One of the first things to think about when choosing a domain name is even though they can be hundred of characters in length, the shorter the better. Domain names can contain letters, numbers, and hyphens. You should avoid using hyphens if possible, because sometimes they make it hard to communicate your address to other people, and an easy understanding is very important. One drawback to shorter is that a lot of the shorter names are already taken, so your first choice may already be in use. You may have to add to it, or make some small changes to find a short name that is available.

You will also need to decide what top-level domain (TLD) or domain extension to use for your domain. There are many choices, such as .com, .net, .org, and so on. Recently, ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers) who oversees all of this added several new TLD’s, like .biz, and .museum. The TLD doesn’t matter much anymore, so you can use whichever sounds best and is available. If the .com of your choice is taken, maybe the .net version is available.

When selecting your domain, if you are operating a business website, you want it to reflect something about your products or type of business. For example, if your business is Joes Online Store, but your main product is blue widgets, your domain should be something to show that, like bluewidgets.net, or joesbluewidgets.com. People shopping for blue widgets will find you that way when they do a search. (It does take a long time and some effort to make yourself visible in a search unless your product is very unique and/or one-of-a-kind. That is called “search engine optimization”) If you just use joesonlinestore.com as your domain, unless people know your name already you will be hard to find.

So, the key points of domain name selection are to keep it short, keep it simple and make it mean something relating to the purpose of your business. You can have more than one domain name pointing to the same website, in fact this may help improve your search engine rankings. This concludes the tutorial about how to choose a domain name.

Becoming Familiar And Navigating Around in cPanel

 

Lets learn about cPanel, and how to navigate it’s many pages and functions. Making sure that your cPanel works at its best and set up just as you want it. This tutorial will assume that you are logged into your cPanel. If you are having trouble doing that, please see the tutorial named “How to Login to cPanel”.

One of the first things you should do is go to Preferences, and click on Update Contact Info. It is very important that you keep that information up-to-date so that you can receive any important email from your hosting company.

You can go to the top of the left column, and check out the Switch Theme pull-down list. From here you can easily change how your cPanel looks by changing the theme, but it does not change the way it works.

The Switch Account drop down list. You will find this list on top of the right column. If you have more than one account, this list will show you which account you are currently controlling with cPanel, and you can switch accounts here.

Stats. Scroll down, and on the left you can see important information about the account. For example, it will show you how many email account you have, and how many you are allowed with your hosting account. It will give your bandwidth usage, show your home directory, and so much more. Scrolling down further, you will find information about the operating system, php version, the MySQL version and more.

The last stat is Server Status. Click on this link and it will take you to a page that will show you how the server you are on is performing. Green lights mean the server is performing properly. Click the Go Back link to exit.

Now let’s look at the right side of the cPanel screen. The right side includes icons grouped into specific boxes. These icons allow you to do specific tasks within cPanel like checking your webmail, setting up databases, setting up email addresses and auto-responders.

At the very bottom of the page is a link called Documentation. Documentation is the link to a comprehensive cPanel Manual where you can learn all there is to know about cPanel. This manual contains information about all the features of cPanel, and has sections on everything from common questions to something from every section in cPanel. It is always available from the home page of your cPanel.

Something new in this version of cPanel is that you can rearrange the windows to suit your needs. For example, if you would like to have the window titled Mail on the top, you can move it by simply dragging and dropping the window where you want it.

This ends the tutorial. You should now be more familiar with cPanel and some of its features. To learn more, you can return to the cPanel Documentation link at the bottom of the cPanel main page.

You can now exit cPanel by closing your browser, or by using the Logout button in the upper right corner. Remember, if you are using a public computer, ALWAYS Logout of cPanel before closing due to security reasons.

How To Set Up A Cron Job

 

This tutorial is going to show you how to setup a cron job in cPanel the easy way. You can set a command or script to run at a specific time every day, week, etc. This tutorial will assume that you are logged into your cPanel. If you are having trouble doing that, please see the tutorial named “How to Login to cPanel”.

Scroll down to the Advanced Section on the main page of your cPanel, and click on the icon named Cron Jobs. This will take you to the main Cron Job page, where it lists two different experience levels to choose from: Standard and Advanced (Unix Style). This tutorial is going to teach the Standard approach.

Click on the Standard Button. This will take you to a screen showing a Standard Cron Manager. Every time a cron job runs, the results are sent to an email address. The top line asks for the email address where you would like the cron job results sent. Enter that address into the box. Below is a box marked Entry 1. The first line is Command to Run: with a box after. In the box you need to enter the command of the script you want to run, including the path (all the way from root) For example, a command might look like this: “home/abc123/public_html/cgi-bin/clients.cgi” This command includes the entire path, all the way from the root directory.

Next, we need to specify the timing of the cron. We need to determine when and how often we want the script to run. There are boxes with different listings above them – Minute(s), Hour(s), Day(s), Month(s), Weekday(s). Using the information within each box, set the time, day, month, and day of the week you want your cron to run. When it is all set click the Save Crontab button. This will take you to a confirmation screen that will verify that your cron job has been set. Click on the Go Back link.

To return to the Standard Cron Manager at any time, click on the Standard button on the main Cron Job page. You can edit your cron, or delete it entirely by simply clicking on the delete button in the Entry box. You can also set up additional cron jobs. Return to your main cPanel page by clicking the HOME link in the upper left corner.

This is the end of the tutorial. You now know how to setup Cron Jobs the easy way, and then edit them, delete them, or add additional ones. You can add as many as you wish, but REMEMBER, Cron Jobs have the potential to take up a lot of server resources.

You can now exit cPanel by closing your browser, or by using the Logout button in the upper right corner. Remember, if you are using a public computer, ALWAYS Logout of cPanel before closing due to security reasons.